Writing an action research article

Describe the sampling strategy Describe the intervention if applicable Identify the main study variables Describe data collection instruments and procedures Outline analysis methods Report on data collection and recruitment response rates, etc. Describe participants demographic, clinical condition, etc. Present key findings with respect to the central research question Present secondary findings secondary outcomes, subgroup analyses, etc. Discussion State the main findings of the study Discuss the main results with reference to previous research Discuss policy and practice implications of the results Analyse the strengths and limitations of the study Offer perspectives for future work View Large The Methods section should provide the readers with sufficient detail about the study methods to be able to reproduce the study if so desired.

Writing an action research article

Taking informed action Step 1—Selecting a Focus The action research process begins with serious reflection directed toward identifying a topic or topics worthy of a busy teacher's time. Considering the incredible demands on today's classroom teachers, no activity is worth doing unless it promises to make the central part of a teacher's work more successful and satisfying.

Thus, selecting a focus, the first step in the process, is vitally important. Selecting a focus begins with the teacher researcher or the team of action researchers asking: What element s of our practice or what aspect of student learning do we wish to investigate?

Step 2—Clarifying Theories The second step involves identifying the values, beliefs, and theoretical perspectives the researchers hold relating to their focus. For example, if teachers are concerned about increasing responsible classroom behavior, it will be helpful for them to begin by clarifying which approach—using punishments and rewards, allowing students to experience the natural consequences of their behaviors, or some other strategy—they feel will work best in helping students acquire responsible classroom behavior habits.

Step 3—Identifying Research Questions Once a focus area has been selected and the researcher's perspectives and beliefs about that focus have been clarified, the next step is to generate a set of personally meaningful research questions to guide the inquiry.

Step 4—Collecting Data Professional educators always want their instructional decisions to be based on the best possible data. Action researchers can accomplish this by making sure that the data used to justify their actions are valid meaning the information represents what the researchers say it does and reliable meaning the researchers are confident about the accuracy of their data.

Lastly, before data are used to make teaching decisions, teachers must be confident that the lessons drawn from the data align with any unique characteristics of their classroom or school.

To ensure reasonable validity and reliability, action researchers should avoid relying on any single source of data.

writing an action research article

Most teacher researchers use a process called triangulation to enhance the validity and reliability of their findings.

Basically, triangulation means using multiple independent sources of data to answer one's questions. Triangulation is like studying an object located inside a box by viewing it through various windows cut into the sides of the box.

When planning instruction, teachers want the techniques they choose to be appropriate for the unique qualities of their students. Because the data being collected come from the very students and teachers who are engaged with the treatment, the relevance of the findings is assured.

Fortunately, classrooms and schools are, by their nature, data-rich environments. Each day a child is in class, he or she is producing or not producing work, is interacting productively with classmates or experiencing difficulties in social situations, and is completing assignments proficiently or poorly.

Teachers not only see these events transpiring before their eyes, they generally record these events in their grade books. The key to managing triangulated data collection is, first, to be effective and efficient in collecting the material that is already swirling around the classroom, and, second, to identify other sources of data that might be effectively surfaced with tests, classroom discussions, or questionnaires.

Step 5—Analyzing Data Although data analysis often brings to mind the use of complex statistical calculations, this is rarely the case for the action researcher.

A number of relatively user-friendly procedures can help a practitioner identify the trends and patterns in action research data.

How to Write an Action Research Proposal

During this portion of the seven-step process, teacher researchers will methodically sort, sift, rank, and examine their data to answer two generic questions: What is the story told by these data?

Why did the story play itself out this way? By answering these two questions, the teacher researcher can acquire a better understanding of the phenomenon under investigation and as a result can end up producing grounded theory regarding what might be done to improve the situation.

Step 6—Reporting Results It is often said that teaching is a lonely endeavor. It is doubly sad that so many teachers are left alone in their classrooms to reinvent the wheel on a daily basis.

The loneliness of teaching is unfortunate not only because of its inefficiency, but also because when dealing with complex problems the wisdom of several minds is inevitably better than one.

The sad history of teacher isolation may explain why the very act of reporting on their action research has proven so powerful for both the researchers and their colleagues.

The reporting of action research most often occurs in informal settings that are far less intimidating than the venues where scholarly research has traditionally been shared. Faculty meetings, brown bag lunch seminars, and teacher conferences are among the most common venues for sharing action research with peers.Action Research is an international, interdisciplinary, peer reviewed, quarterly published refereed journal which is a forum for the development of the theory and practice of action research.

The Journal of Teacher Action Research is an international journal that publishes peer-reviewed articles and lesson plans written by teachers and researchers to inform classroom practice.

The journal serves as a practical medium to read and publish classroom-based research. Action Research in Education. Library LibGuides Course Guides Action Research in Education Citation and Writing Help Search this Guide Search. Home; Article Databases; Peer-reviewed/Refereed Articles; Books; Data & Statistics APA Style is the preferred writing style for the discipline of education.

Below you will find resources that will. Article Writing; Ideas for Topics; Save this course for later. Don't have time for it all now?

No problem, save it as a course and come back to it later. As long as you have planned a good structure for the parts of a research paper, both approaches are acceptable and it is a matter of preference.

writing an action research article

MASTER IN TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE Guidelines for Writing an Action Research Project The basic steps • Review your current practice. About this journal. Action Research is an international, interdisciplinary, peer reviewed, quarterly published refereed journal which is a forum for the development of the theory and practice of action research.

The journal publishes quality articles on accounts of action research projects, explorations in the philosophy and methodology of action .

Writing an action research paper is a rare assignment and we are here to help you out. Basic facts, necessary steps, general rule - the most useful info in our up-to-date guide. Writing an action research paper, - Write an essay on the evolution of computers. Our writers know both peculiarities of academic writing and paper formatting rules. idea of the action-reflection cycle, embodied in the different action research. approaches, and the expectations and rigours of writing up, inherent in. action research projects, reflection could remain tacit, amorphous, ‘in’. action and with little perceivable benefit to practice.
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