An analysis of love bather by am klein and the swimmer by irving layton

Come and celebrate Layton's th birthday! Klein, Al Purdy, as well as mentor to later poets, particularly Leonard Cohen. He is a great favourite of mine, as he is, I feel, the Canadian equivalent to D. Read more about him here and here.

An analysis of love bather by am klein and the swimmer by irving layton

For her final mouth was not water but a curse, A small black hole, a black rent in the universe, Which damned the green earth, stars and trees in its stillness And the inescapable lousiness of growing old.

And I record she was comfortless, vituperative, Ignorant, glad, and much else besides; I believe She endlessly praised her black eyebrows, their thick weave, Till plagiarizing Death leaned down and took them for his mould. And spoiled a dignity I shall not again find, And the fury of her stubborn limited mind; Now none will shake her amber beads and call God blind, Or wear them on a breast so radiantly.

O fierce she was, mean and unaccommodating; But I think now of the toss of her gold earrings, Their proud carnal assertion, and her youngest sings While all the rivers of her red veins move into the sea.

The steadfast yet moving woman died at the age of 89, well after her son had garnered fame from Canada and the world. Being a piece about a late parent, however, is as deep into the definition of the term elegy as the poem goes.

This is not to say that Layton did not care or lament for his late mother, however, indeed it is quite the opposite. Irving Layton cares deeply for his mother; her influence was instrumental in his writing.

So why does he choose to illustrate her, at times, in such an unflattering light? These rhymes serve to emphasize keywords that Layton has used to more thoroughly provide an image of his mother.

The last line of each stanza stands on its own in two ways. Firstly, they are not congruent with their preceding rhymes. Secondly the last lines of each stanza are the only end-stopped, whereas the first lines are not. Imagery Irving Layton is a master imagist, and Keine Lazarovitch is no exception, however in this instance he is painting for us, the portrait of a loved one.

Yet despite her volatile nature, the overall tone of the poem is calm.

An analysis of love bather by am klein and the swimmer by irving layton

Layton effectively portrays this seemingly angry woman in her steadfast and empowered dignity.Irving Layton's love poetry is neither a celebration of women nor an enduring tribute to the women who have touched his life; yet, to call his poetry sexist, to brand him a male chauvinist and leave it at that, does little but to state the obvious.

Articles Celebrity and the Poetic Dialogue of Irving Layton and Leonard Cohen Joel Deshaye McGill University 1 At the beginning of Leonard Cohen’s career as a poet, he met Irving Layton, the most controversial mentor he . Irving Layton Reads His Poem The Swimmer The Canadian poet, Irving Layton, taught at Sir George Williams (SGW) during the s and s.

He was named Poet in Residence in Irving Layton's love poetry is neither a celebration of women nor an enduring tribute to the women who have touched his life; yet, to call his poetry sexist, to brand him a male chauvinist and leave it at that, does little but to state the obvious. Irving Layton’s Keine Lazarovtich seems almost abrasive at first read, with his depiction of a “comfortless” and probably overbearing mother, yet there is a sense of pride and intense love at the same time.

Layton clearly admired his mother, and seeks to honor that admiration by keeping his personal feelings of sadness at her. 'Lone Bather'; written by A. M. Klein, and 'The Swimmer'; by Irving Layton both offer such messages to the reader.

At first glance, these messages seem surprising similar, but after further examination they are in fact strikingly different.

Irving Layton, Great Canadian Poet: Irving Layton passes today at 93