A shopkeeper essay

Forty-nine of us, forty-eight men and one woman, lay on the green waiting for the spike to open.

A shopkeeper essay

It is one of those stories in which much is hidden and unsaid, a quality that makes it, in spite of the simple clarity of the prose, rather mysterious, as mysterious as life itself.

It raises questions that must have occurred to many people at some point in their lives. How do transformations happen? How does a person move, when all seems lost, from a condition of rigidity, fear, and despair, to acceptance and wisdom? For this is indeed what happens to Pramod, the protagonist, in a moment of quiet epiphany that is all the more moving for the understated way in which it is presented.

Upadhyay is not an author who beats his reader over the head with an explicit moral or message. Although for the Western reader the Nepalese setting is exotic and some of the local customs unfamiliar, the basic situation in the story is easy to understand.

It quickly becomes clear that Pramod lacks such skills. He is himself a somewhat ordinary man. There is nothing special about him.

A shopkeeper essay

With his wife and baby and his job as an accountant with a firm in the city, he is a conventional middle-class Everyman. The misfortune he meets is not his fault. It could happen to anyone, as he himself points out. And like most people in such a situation, once he has gotten over the initial shock, he tries to be optimistic about the prospects of finding a new job, saying that he will end up with something even better than before.

This of course is what people say to themselves, and others say to them, in order to mask their fear that it might in fact not be so.

A Shopkeeper's Millennium Essay Example | Graduateway

Pramod does everything he can to remedy the situation, especially badgering his influential, if corrupt, brother-in-law, to help him. But when nothing happens, his confidence sags. This wounds his pride. Pramod is very conscious of social position and class. When his wife comes up with a practical suggestion, that he sell their land in the south and set up a general store or a stationery outlet, he dismisses it out of hand.

Richard Rive's, "Buckingham Palace," District Six focuses on a small community, unable to establish themselves outside of gangs, thievery, alcohol abuse and prostitution. District Six sits at the. And if anyone can figure out decent ways for a Robin-Hanson-ian em-clan to put together a similar sort of internal legal system for its members, and can describe how cultural-evolutionary pressures would lead em-clans to tend towards any particular systemic details, I would love to read about it. Published: Thu, 20 Apr A customer is the most important person in the company. Customers are corporate or individuals upon whom the companies depend, whereas the customers do not depend upon any particular company.

Being a shopkeeper is beneath him, he insists. He has his perceived position and role in the social hierarchy, and he refuses to let go of it.

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But since his job search continues to be fruitless, what is he to do? Immediately after Pramod loses his job, he seems inclined, in a vague sort of way, and perhaps without being fully conscious of it, to turn to religion.

Early in the morning, he goes to the temple, and even stands in line for tika from the Hindu priest in the shrine. Tika also known as bindi is a red dot, traditionally made from the red flower kum kum, that is applied to the forehead between and slightly above the eyes.

Usually tika is worn by married women, but priests and other men who are on a spiritual path wear it also. It is clear that obtaining tika is something Pramod does not usually do. He does not appear to be a particularly religious man, although religion seems to play a prominent role in his society.

But on this occasion, when his life has been suddenly upset, he turns to religion, perhaps for hope and security. This is not at all uncommon for those who suddenly find themselves in a very difficult situation or who have suffered some trauma.

They seek reassurance that everything will be all right. While Pramod waits, he gazes at the religious pictures on the wall. He is especially drawn to one that depicts Lord Shiva, one of the three most important gods in the Hindu pantheon, with the snake god, Nag, around his neck.

The entire section is 2, words.And if anyone can figure out decent ways for a Robin-Hanson-ian em-clan to put together a similar sort of internal legal system for its members, and can describe how cultural-evolutionary pressures would lead em-clans to tend towards any particular systemic details, I would love to read about it.

Richard Rive's, "Buckingham Palace," District Six focuses on a small community, unable to establish themselves outside of gangs, thievery, alcohol abuse and prostitution.

District Six sits at the. Re possible reasons for passivism: my personal one is that I had tried activism a few times over the years, and it backfired in various traumatic and unexpected ways, even though my words and actions were indistinguishable (to me) from those taken by other, much more successful activists.

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Samrat Upadhyay’s short story “The Good Shopkeeper” focuses mainly on the evolution of protagonist Pramod as he sorts through his options upon losing his job.

Although the female characters. Manifesto of the Communist Party. A spectre is haunting Europe — the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

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